This Agreement Established The Universal Principle Of Sovereignty Of States

96 It is interesting to note that one of the main challenges to the legitimacy of international law is that it does not respect the sovereignty of States and enters areas where they should freely make their own decisions. Sovereign states are the main subjects of binding international standards. State sovereignty is often perceived in international law as a competence, immunity or power, in particular as the power to make autonomous decisions (so-called sovereign autonomy). And most obligations under international legal norms directly limit the action of States. The legitimate authority of international law is therefore often contrary to the sovereignty of the State, just as the legitimate authority of national law opposes individual autonomy. 58 Sovereignty as authority or independence can only be understood by reference to the values that constitute a good state or, more generally, a good political unity. . . .